Development in Lincoln

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Upcoming Public Meetings & Open Houses


Greenlane and Ontario Street: Public Meeting
A public meeting is scheduled on Monday, November 29 at 6 p.m. to discuss a proposed amendment to the Zoning By-law for the property located northeast of Greenlane and Ontario Street.

An application has been submitted by UrbanSolutions Planning & Land Development Consultants on behalf of the owner of a vacant 1.53 hectare (3.8 ac) property at the above-mentioned location. The application has been revised to propose the construction of a 10-storey mixed-use building, with an 8-storey portion along Greenlane Road. The proposal consists of 370 residential units and 3 commercial units comprised of 303 square metres of space. For more details, see the Notice of Public Meeting November 29, 2021 and other background documents on the right side of this page.


3583 Zimmerman Road: Public Open House & Public Meeting
A public open house has been scheduled for December 1 at 6 p.m., and a subsequent Public Meeting on December 15 at 6 p.m. to discuss an Official Plan and Zoning By-law Amendment application, submitted by Stephen Bedford of Land X Developments on behalf of the owner of an agricultural vacant 31.2 hectare (77.2 ac) property located east of Zimmerman Road, south of Fly Road, and west of Mountain Street.

The application consists of a two storey, 2,855 square metre estate winery and ten units of short-term accommodation for winery guests and/or tourists. For more details, see the Notice of Public Meeting November 29, 2021 and other background documents on the right side of this page.


The Planning Process – And Why It Matters

Communities need to plan for the future. In Ontario communities, new developments undergo an extensive process well before shovels hit the ground. In a growing community like Lincoln, it may seem that development happens quickly.

In reality, there is much planning, consideration and opportunity for public engagement that are important aspects of the planning process. The process can often be years in the making and takes many factors into account – some within the Town’s control and some determined by legislation at higher levels of government.

Through various documents and bylaws, planning provides a framework for:

  • smart development that meets the demands of our growing community;
  • appropriate locations for buildings and structures like homes, shops, parks, offices, and industrial buildings;
  • a network of infrastructure, including roads, water mains, sewers, and transit.

Successful planning protects the environment, supports economic growth, conserves cultural heritage and contributes to a unique sense of place.


So how does it work?

Potential development applications to redevelop sites in Lincoln are subject to local, regional and Provincial policies. These include:

  • Planning Act – Planning in Ontario is governed by the provincial Planning Act. The Act sets out the steps that municipalities must follow during planning processes such as the requirement for public notice, and ensures municipalities make decisions that align with provincial policies such as environmental protection and the preservation of farmland.
  • Provincial legislation – The Provincial Policy Statement and the Greenbelt Act which identify where and how much development can occur throughout Ontario
  • Niagara Regional Official Plan – the blueprint for growth in all of Niagara region
  • Town of Lincoln Official Plan – conforms to the Regional official plan and provides choices and opportunities for housing, employment, transportation, social, recreational and cultural amenities
  • Zoning By-law - its purpose is to implement the Official Plan and applies to specific properties. It determines what kind of land uses are allowed, the building envelope/size and how they’re sited, and how such items as landscaped open space should be incorporated.

Applications go through a public process to ensure community feedback is taken into consideration and compatibility with the community is evaluated for each potential development. In most cases, upon the Town’s receipt of a planning application, nearby residents will receive notification, as per the Planning Act.


What does development look like in Lincoln?

The Town of Lincoln embraces smart growth principles to achieve sustainable development. This means:

  • Creating vibrant urban centres;
  • Sustaining a strong economy;
  • Ensuring a healthy environment;
  • Combatting urban sprawl through infill and higher density development;
  • Improving the quality of life for residents – to provide better access to transit, better public realm amenities in the neighbourhood, and supporting growth through new or renewed infrastructure.


The role of the Planning and Development Department

The Planning and Development Department is responsible for reviewing and providing a recommendation to Council regarding development applications. All applications require a process of review and decisions but not all applications require the same steps.

The step-by-step process for consent and minor variances and zoning by-law amendments (at right) are examples where an application requires a public process to come to a Committee and/or Council decision. For example, a pool application may not require a public meeting, and in some cases, the approval authority has been delegated by Council to staff.


How can I get involved and learn about development in my neighbourhood?

  • Learn about upcoming projects that have an impact on our community and share your feedback here
  • Contact the Planning and Development Department
    1. If you receive a notice about a proposed development in your neighbourhood, contact or email the planner for more information.
    2. If you see a development proposal sign in your neighbourhood, make note of the telephone number, file number and address of the property for more information.
  • Attend public meetings
    1. Individuals can register to speak at the Committee of Adjustment meetings and have 10 minutes to present your thoughts and concerns about a development.

Planning affects everyone. It determines where you will live, shop, gather, work or go to school. For example, changes made to the Town’s Official Plan and Zoning Bylaw can impact the height and density of new development. Design guidelines can impact the architecture and design elements you see on buildings and structures.

Because planning impacts what we see and the types of spaces we enjoy in our community, the planning process provides opportunities for public input. Under the Planning Act of Ontario, municipalities are required to notify the public, hold public meetings and request input on important planning decisions.


Upcoming Public Meetings & Open Houses


Greenlane and Ontario Street: Public Meeting
A public meeting is scheduled on Monday, November 29 at 6 p.m. to discuss a proposed amendment to the Zoning By-law for the property located northeast of Greenlane and Ontario Street.

An application has been submitted by UrbanSolutions Planning & Land Development Consultants on behalf of the owner of a vacant 1.53 hectare (3.8 ac) property at the above-mentioned location. The application has been revised to propose the construction of a 10-storey mixed-use building, with an 8-storey portion along Greenlane Road. The proposal consists of 370 residential units and 3 commercial units comprised of 303 square metres of space. For more details, see the Notice of Public Meeting November 29, 2021 and other background documents on the right side of this page.


3583 Zimmerman Road: Public Open House & Public Meeting
A public open house has been scheduled for December 1 at 6 p.m., and a subsequent Public Meeting on December 15 at 6 p.m. to discuss an Official Plan and Zoning By-law Amendment application, submitted by Stephen Bedford of Land X Developments on behalf of the owner of an agricultural vacant 31.2 hectare (77.2 ac) property located east of Zimmerman Road, south of Fly Road, and west of Mountain Street.

The application consists of a two storey, 2,855 square metre estate winery and ten units of short-term accommodation for winery guests and/or tourists. For more details, see the Notice of Public Meeting November 29, 2021 and other background documents on the right side of this page.


The Planning Process – And Why It Matters

Communities need to plan for the future. In Ontario communities, new developments undergo an extensive process well before shovels hit the ground. In a growing community like Lincoln, it may seem that development happens quickly.

In reality, there is much planning, consideration and opportunity for public engagement that are important aspects of the planning process. The process can often be years in the making and takes many factors into account – some within the Town’s control and some determined by legislation at higher levels of government.

Through various documents and bylaws, planning provides a framework for:

  • smart development that meets the demands of our growing community;
  • appropriate locations for buildings and structures like homes, shops, parks, offices, and industrial buildings;
  • a network of infrastructure, including roads, water mains, sewers, and transit.

Successful planning protects the environment, supports economic growth, conserves cultural heritage and contributes to a unique sense of place.


So how does it work?

Potential development applications to redevelop sites in Lincoln are subject to local, regional and Provincial policies. These include:

  • Planning Act – Planning in Ontario is governed by the provincial Planning Act. The Act sets out the steps that municipalities must follow during planning processes such as the requirement for public notice, and ensures municipalities make decisions that align with provincial policies such as environmental protection and the preservation of farmland.
  • Provincial legislation – The Provincial Policy Statement and the Greenbelt Act which identify where and how much development can occur throughout Ontario
  • Niagara Regional Official Plan – the blueprint for growth in all of Niagara region
  • Town of Lincoln Official Plan – conforms to the Regional official plan and provides choices and opportunities for housing, employment, transportation, social, recreational and cultural amenities
  • Zoning By-law - its purpose is to implement the Official Plan and applies to specific properties. It determines what kind of land uses are allowed, the building envelope/size and how they’re sited, and how such items as landscaped open space should be incorporated.

Applications go through a public process to ensure community feedback is taken into consideration and compatibility with the community is evaluated for each potential development. In most cases, upon the Town’s receipt of a planning application, nearby residents will receive notification, as per the Planning Act.


What does development look like in Lincoln?

The Town of Lincoln embraces smart growth principles to achieve sustainable development. This means:

  • Creating vibrant urban centres;
  • Sustaining a strong economy;
  • Ensuring a healthy environment;
  • Combatting urban sprawl through infill and higher density development;
  • Improving the quality of life for residents – to provide better access to transit, better public realm amenities in the neighbourhood, and supporting growth through new or renewed infrastructure.


The role of the Planning and Development Department

The Planning and Development Department is responsible for reviewing and providing a recommendation to Council regarding development applications. All applications require a process of review and decisions but not all applications require the same steps.

The step-by-step process for consent and minor variances and zoning by-law amendments (at right) are examples where an application requires a public process to come to a Committee and/or Council decision. For example, a pool application may not require a public meeting, and in some cases, the approval authority has been delegated by Council to staff.


How can I get involved and learn about development in my neighbourhood?

  • Learn about upcoming projects that have an impact on our community and share your feedback here
  • Contact the Planning and Development Department
    1. If you receive a notice about a proposed development in your neighbourhood, contact or email the planner for more information.
    2. If you see a development proposal sign in your neighbourhood, make note of the telephone number, file number and address of the property for more information.
  • Attend public meetings
    1. Individuals can register to speak at the Committee of Adjustment meetings and have 10 minutes to present your thoughts and concerns about a development.

Planning affects everyone. It determines where you will live, shop, gather, work or go to school. For example, changes made to the Town’s Official Plan and Zoning Bylaw can impact the height and density of new development. Design guidelines can impact the architecture and design elements you see on buildings and structures.

Because planning impacts what we see and the types of spaces we enjoy in our community, the planning process provides opportunities for public input. Under the Planning Act of Ontario, municipalities are required to notify the public, hold public meetings and request input on important planning decisions.


Do you have any questions about development in Lincoln?

We hope this page offers some more information on how development occurs in Ontario, Niagara Region and Lincoln. If you have any further questions, or questions about specific developments, please send it here and we will do our best to reply within 2-3 business days. 

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    Looking for start up new building

    Lisete Barbosa asked 6 days ago

    Hi, thanks for reaching out to us. We recommend that you reach out directly to the Planning and Development Department to ask specific questions about new building start-ups. Please e-mail planningapplications@lincoln.ca.

    Thank you. 

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    Re: 3221 North Service Road. I watched the Committee of the Whole Zoom meeting November 8th and wanted to comment on this proposed development. My wife and I are residents of Beamsville but we have growing concerns about the number and magnitude of recent mid- and high-rise residential developments that are proposed and recently approved in the Town of Lincoln. The above proposed development really takes the cake. The Prudhomme lands (including this site) have a Secondary Plan approved in 2018, (just over 3 years ago) and the developer paid no heed whatsoever to that, which had maximum building heights of 15 storeys. His now revised plan has been moderated to 20 and 23 storeys and 431 units as well as increasing the parking podium from 3 storeys (which is allowed), to 6 on this very small 1.5+ acre former gas station site. Also, the total density proposed is 124% higher than allowed. I am upset that the planning staff would waste a minute of their time with the initial proposal knowing how ridiculous it was in light of the Secondary Plan’s restrictions on height and density. The planning staff should have simply told the developer that they need to come back with a proposal in line with the Secondary Plan. The residents of Lincoln need our council and their staff to take a much harder stance on these types of over-the-top developments. I thought the Deputy Mayor asked a very telling question to the developer’s planner – paraphrasing it “if they had ever done up a proposal to the Secondary Plan requirements? He said the plan you have in front of you is what we did.” They did not and had no intentions of following the regulations. On the issue of Community Benefits – that is a horrible loophole developers use to get higher density. I have been in the real estate business for over 45 years and have seen this ploy used all the time. They are proposing $300,000 cash and in return they get an additional 136 Units! You could not build a small bungalow for $300,000. I took a quick look at resale condo apartment prices in the Casablanca area of Grimsby. An average price for a 650 sq ft unit with 1 underground parking space was about $500,000 or about $750 per square foot. Using this math the developer gets an extra $68,000,000! There are so many other outpoints with this proposed development. The developer does not want to comply with: • minimum unit sizes • total density requirement • building height • minimum sizes of the parking spaces; or • size of the Parking Aisles so you have cars closer when parked and harder to navigate the aisles. The developer stated that his hard costs to build is about $500 per square foot, which makes it necessary for each tower to have 200 units, otherwise it is not economically feasible. I would propose he simply build stick-built stacked townhouses, which he has done in other communities, at a cost of about half that and he would still make a profit; the town would not have the lake obscured with these ugly Mississauga-style, soulless towers, less parking and traffic issues. The town also retained an architect consultant from Toronto I believe to help with the design. Could they not have retained one from Niagara who would be more sensitive to the fabric of the area? Take a look at the eyesore these folks built in Grimsby. If the town continues to demand adherence to the Secondary Plan here, the residents would hold the province and not the council responsible if the developer went to the Tribunal and won higher heights and density. Building to the Secondary Plan still provides housing numbers but also sends a message that we take our zoning and Official Plan seriously so future developers will know we are not going to be pushed around. If we do not, what do you think the next developer will do when it is their turn to build? I was heartened by the overall responses that I heard in the Zoom meeting November 8 from our councilors and Mayor Easton and I hope it carries through when council meets to consider it and stick to their guns and only allow what is permitted by the Secondary Plan. Please do not engage with the Community Benefits shell game. Thanks for considering. Best Regards, David B. Jacobs

    DBJ asked 6 days ago

    Thank you for your comments.  The applicant, on behalf of the owner of 3221 North Service, submitted a complete Zoning By-law Amendment application to the Town for the proposed high-rise residential development.  This planning process is legislated by the Province of Ontario under the Planning Act and allows any property owner to submit planning applications that do not meet the Town’s Official Plan policies and/or Zoning By-law. Under the Planning Act, The Town is required to process these planning applications and make decisions in a timely manner.  Council have not made any decisions with respect to the current application and it remains under review by the Town staff.  Building height, density and community benefits are important components of the subject planning application and the comments you have provided will be considered as part of the Town’s review of this proposal.

     Please note - If you would like to make a formal written submission, it will be included as part of the public record and presented at the Committee of the Whole as part of the staff recommendation report.. To do so, please contact the Clerk of the Town of Lincoln at clerks@lincoln.ca

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    Do you post minutes of the Planning Dept meetings?

    Sylvia hokansson asked 19 days ago

    Thanks for your question. Planning and Economic Development meetings are part of the Committee of the Whole meetings. 

    Links to the minutes of these meetings can be found in the Council and Committee Calendar on the Town’s website: https://lincoln.ca/council-agendas-minutes

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    Where to start? 1. My concern, specifically regarding the highrises proposed for the North Service Road and for Greenland at Ontario, is that developers seem to believe they can ignore all height and density restrictions in Lincoln as long as they can buy us off with "provision of community benefits". This needs to stop. 2. Every unit in these buildings requires at least one parking spot because there is NO RELIABLE PUBLIC TRANSIT. And I don't want to hear the argument that we can't get public transit until we have the density -- how many years will that take, truly? (and if ever -- and my guess is they would still need a car to drive to the nearest station.) Re: Greenlane/Ontario highrise. I can't imagine the congestion at the Greelane/Ontario intersection, especially so close to the QEW ramps. Re: North Service Road highrise. I truly question the environmental impacts (and engineering safety) of FIVE LEVELS of underground parking so close to the Lake Ontario shoreline. 3. Lincoln needs more affordable rental housing, not expensive condos out of reach of regular, reliable and affordable public transit. You think these new builds will improve the situation? Why don't you ask the affordable housing experts at the Region? 4. If Lincoln wants to build its economic development on the tourism and business from Benchlands wineries and orchards, this type of development does nothing for that goal. They are eyesores that will not add to the community being a tourism destination. You may want to look at what NOTL does to mitigate this type of development (granted they are not along the highway).

    CP asked 23 days ago

    Thank you for your comments.  The applications for Zoning By-law Amendment at 3221 North Service Road and the northeast corner of Greenlane and Ontario Street are both currently under review by the Town.  The comments that you have provided will be considered as part of the Town’s review of this proposal.  

    If you would like to make a formal written submission to be included as part of the public record, please contact the Clerk of the Town of Lincoln.

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    Who is going to pay for the fire services and equipment required for high rises? It better be the developer! As for property taxes what assurances do we have that they will be paying their fair share of education, health and other municipal/regional taxes. My understanding is that due to building up, the total taxes payable by a family of four living in an apartment building are less than they would be by a spread of a family of four living in a house.

    DeanPoulter asked about 1 month ago

    Thanks for sharing your question with us. 

    As with all services provided by the Town, each resident pays their appropriate share based on the assessed value of the property and associated levy rate this includes education, fire, etc. 

    It’s also important to note that the overall footprint per apartment unit is usually much smaller. Fewer taxes are charged for an apartment unit compared to a house, since the overall footprint per unit is much smaller, and apartments represent a much more efficient land use from an infrastructure perspective.

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    The last thing we need is more multi use housing. When is the town going to go after commercial business. We lost all our clothing stores.we have enough pizza and dentist to support a large city put not one big retailer. The town continues to grow we have two grocery stores no building material stores no major clothing stores. What the plans for these and when is downtown going to be improved. Bonnie

    Bonnie Robinson asked about 1 month ago

    Hi Bonnie, thank you for the questions. Town staff recognize the need for more commercial space in our community, that is why we are actively engaging the private sector to build more commercial development in the downtown cores of Beamsville, Vineland, and Jordan. Staff are engaging with the business community to learn what the gaps and opportunities are for our community. We agree that to attract investment we need to be proactive in supporting new investment, but also existing businesses to scale up. For the most part, we do not have many vacancies in our community, which highlights that Lincoln is a great place to own a business. The Prudhommes development, once completed, will add commercial and employment lands to our community and present an opportunity for a variety of new businesses. In addition to this area, the Ontario Street Corridor, including the GO Secondary Plan area, as well as the downtown central business district areas all include land use permissions that encourage more types of commercial/retail and employment opportunities.

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    I was watching the public meeting tonight, regarding the townhouses. From what I saw was 18 units crammed in. Very little landscaping. Basically just a postage sign size. The 6 visitor parking spots are smaller than recommended. Even if half of these homes have company, there is not enough visitor parking. All I see is a way that the town can maximize funds from taxes, by allowing as many homes in to a small space. It is going to end up looking like the area off chestnut. No character to the homes being built. The most simplest designs. The homes being built by St Marks are awful. All brown square boxes, they all look the same. The town needs to start looking at more home with some character to them. Look at Niagara on the lake a d some of the homes being built there. More small town feel. We should also look at building a more upscale subdivisions. Houses that don’t all look the same. Make sidewalks wider. The Main Street needs more stores that encourage people to want to stroll and shop. It is all service. I have no reason to go uptown except for the dentist and eye doctor. I end up going to Oakville and Dundas to do shopping as they have interesting stores to go in. And what is ever going to be done with the empty lot beside the shoe store, where the 2for1 pizza place burned down. Encourage some to build there, maybe that would be a start for some new stores to open. All the new condos and homes has increased traffic on Ontario Street. Trying to get out of our street is virtually impossible.

    Lsiebert asked 4 months ago

    The empty lot is actually two empty lots beside the shoe store and Home Hardware. The Town is actively engaged with the two owners to explore options to rebuild on the lots. Please stay tuned for updates.

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    In zoning by laws for projects residents within 90metres get notified of proposed projects how doe we as residents of beamsville get this changed to all residents being notified. Do we ask for amendment or what. These projects affect all of us not just people within required distance

    Snoman asked 4 months ago

    Per Planning Act notification requirements, Town staff are required to circulate Zoning By-law Amendment applications to property owners within 120m (400 ft) of the subject property, as well as various departments and agencies for comment. In addition to this requirement, the Notice is placed on the Town’s Development Process page under Speak Up Lincoln. For larger development applications, the notice is also placed in the local newspaper and advertised on all Town social media platforms.

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    Looking for an update about information provided on this page by staff as below: "With respect to the current Town zoning by-law, it dates back to 1993 and is not an up to date representation of development needs in the current context. As such, the Town is working on updating it to better align with updated Provincial policies that encourage growth in urban areas. " What is happening now in terms of this update process, and how does citizen consultation play into the process of the update?

    ALytle asked 4 months ago

    The Zoning By-law review process commenced in 2019 and has included agency and public consultation. Comments have been received and the consultant is currently finalizing the draft Zoning By-law. Another public consultation will occur in the Fall to present the draft document. If you wish to be notified of this meeting, please contact Monika Cocchiara, Manager of Planning & Development at (905) 563-8205 ext. 270. 

    Where properties are located within a Community Improvement Plan area and the proposed development meets the requirements of the grant programs, property owners are eligible for a Community Improvement Grant. The financial impact of the grant programs is based on the grant program applied for, i.e. Development Charge Reduction, Revitalization (Tax Increment), Building & Façade Improvement, etc. For further information, please contact Monika Cocchiara, Manager of Planning & Development at (905) 563-8205 ext. 270.

    Council has decided not to place a hold on CIP applications as the CIP review process is taking place.

     With regards to ensuring high ecological standards, the Niagara Region has adopted a Smart Growth Incentive Program and Design Criteria to encourage growth that balances not only environmental needs but also economic and social needs.  The environmental design criteria help to conserve energy and resources and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, such as, but not limited to, garden/green roofs, high-albedo materials, use of renewable energy sources, drought-tolerant native species, use of captured rainwater, etc. 

     If parkland is not proposed in a development, developers are required to pay cash in lieu of parkland which the Town uses towards new and existing neighbourhood parks and recreation amenities. New residential neighbourhoods in Lincoln, including at Prudhommes will/do include public park space.

     All questions asked on the Speak Up Lincoln page are answered publicly, as such, Council can view all questions and responses. 

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    We don’t agree with 26 and 28 floor buildings that are proposed for the area east of Victoria Ave. at the lake. Obviously you would benefit from the land taxes. The Vineland shore land shouldn’t be ruined by two buildings that high. Direct your developers to provide for plans for condos that are not any where as high. We do not want to look like Miami North!! I can’t even imagine the traffic problems arising from the proposed “Sky scrapers”. Make sure this proposal is defeated!!

    Peter Crich asked 2 months ago

    Thank you for providing your comments.  The proposed amendment to the Zoning By-law at 3221 North Service Road is currently under review by the Town.  Building height is an important component of the planning application and the comments that you have provided will be considered as part of the Town’s review of this proposal.  If you would like to make a formal written submission, it will be included as part of the public record and presented at the Committee of the Whole. To do so, please contact the Clerk of the Town of Lincoln.

Page last updated: 24 November 2021, 11:02