Development in Lincoln

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Upcoming Virtual Open Houses and Public Meetings

3411, 3417, 3423 & 3429 Rittenhouse Road

  • Virtual Public Meeting - Monday, March 28, 2022 at 6 p.m. POSTPONED. DATE TBD


The Planning Process – And Why It Matters

Communities need to plan for the future. In Ontario communities, new developments undergo an extensive process well before shovels hit the ground. In a growing community like Lincoln, it may seem that development happens quickly.

In reality, there is much planning, consideration and opportunity for public engagement that are important aspects of the planning process. The process can often be years in the making and takes many factors into account – some within the Town’s control and some determined by legislation at higher levels of government.

Through various documents and bylaws, planning provides a framework for:

  • smart development that meets the demands of our growing community;
  • appropriate locations for buildings and structures like homes, shops, parks, offices, and industrial buildings;
  • a network of infrastructure, including roads, water mains, sewers, and transit.

Successful planning protects the environment, supports economic growth, conserves cultural heritage and contributes to a unique sense of place.


So how does it work?

Potential development applications to redevelop sites in Lincoln are subject to local, regional and Provincial policies. These include:

  • Planning Act – Planning in Ontario is governed by the provincial Planning Act. The Act sets out the steps that municipalities must follow during planning processes such as the requirement for public notice, and ensures municipalities make decisions that align with provincial policies such as environmental protection and the preservation of farmland.
  • Provincial legislation – The Provincial Policy Statement and the Greenbelt Act which identify where and how much development can occur throughout Ontario
  • Niagara Regional Official Plan – the blueprint for growth in all of Niagara region
  • Town of Lincoln Official Plan – conforms to the Regional official plan and provides choices and opportunities for housing, employment, transportation, social, recreational and cultural amenities
  • Zoning By-law - its purpose is to implement the Official Plan and applies to specific properties. It determines what kind of land uses are allowed, the building envelope/size and how they’re sited, and how such items as landscaped open space should be incorporated.

Applications go through a public process to ensure community feedback is taken into consideration and compatibility with the community is evaluated for each potential development. In most cases, upon the Town’s receipt of a planning application, nearby residents will receive notification, as per the Planning Act.


What does development look like in Lincoln?

The Town of Lincoln embraces smart growth principles to achieve sustainable development. This means:

  • Creating vibrant urban centres;
  • Sustaining a strong economy;
  • Ensuring a healthy environment;
  • Combatting urban sprawl through infill and higher density development;
  • Improving the quality of life for residents – to provide better access to transit, better public realm amenities in the neighbourhood, and supporting growth through new or renewed infrastructure.


The role of the Planning and Development Department

The Planning and Development Department is responsible for reviewing and providing a recommendation to Council regarding development applications. All applications require a process of review and decisions but not all applications require the same steps.

The step-by-step process for consent and minor variances and zoning by-law amendments (at right) are examples where an application requires a public process to come to a Committee and/or Council decision. For example, a pool application may not require a public meeting, and in some cases, the approval authority has been delegated by Council to staff.


How can I get involved and learn about development in my neighbourhood?

  • Learn about upcoming projects that have an impact on our community and share your feedback here
  • Contact the Planning and Development Department
    1. If you receive a notice about a proposed development in your neighbourhood, contact or email the planner for more information.
    2. If you see a development proposal sign in your neighbourhood, make note of the telephone number, file number and address of the property for more information.
  • Attend public meetings
    1. Individuals can register to speak at the Committee of Adjustment meetings and have 10 minutes to present your thoughts and concerns about a development.

Planning affects everyone. It determines where you will live, shop, gather, work or go to school. For example, changes made to the Town’s Official Plan and Zoning Bylaw can impact the height and density of new development. Design guidelines can impact the architecture and design elements you see on buildings and structures.

Because planning impacts what we see and the types of spaces we enjoy in our community, the planning process provides opportunities for public input. Under the Planning Act of Ontario, municipalities are required to notify the public, hold public meetings and request input on important planning decisions.




Upcoming Virtual Open Houses and Public Meetings

3411, 3417, 3423 & 3429 Rittenhouse Road

  • Virtual Public Meeting - Monday, March 28, 2022 at 6 p.m. POSTPONED. DATE TBD


The Planning Process – And Why It Matters

Communities need to plan for the future. In Ontario communities, new developments undergo an extensive process well before shovels hit the ground. In a growing community like Lincoln, it may seem that development happens quickly.

In reality, there is much planning, consideration and opportunity for public engagement that are important aspects of the planning process. The process can often be years in the making and takes many factors into account – some within the Town’s control and some determined by legislation at higher levels of government.

Through various documents and bylaws, planning provides a framework for:

  • smart development that meets the demands of our growing community;
  • appropriate locations for buildings and structures like homes, shops, parks, offices, and industrial buildings;
  • a network of infrastructure, including roads, water mains, sewers, and transit.

Successful planning protects the environment, supports economic growth, conserves cultural heritage and contributes to a unique sense of place.


So how does it work?

Potential development applications to redevelop sites in Lincoln are subject to local, regional and Provincial policies. These include:

  • Planning Act – Planning in Ontario is governed by the provincial Planning Act. The Act sets out the steps that municipalities must follow during planning processes such as the requirement for public notice, and ensures municipalities make decisions that align with provincial policies such as environmental protection and the preservation of farmland.
  • Provincial legislation – The Provincial Policy Statement and the Greenbelt Act which identify where and how much development can occur throughout Ontario
  • Niagara Regional Official Plan – the blueprint for growth in all of Niagara region
  • Town of Lincoln Official Plan – conforms to the Regional official plan and provides choices and opportunities for housing, employment, transportation, social, recreational and cultural amenities
  • Zoning By-law - its purpose is to implement the Official Plan and applies to specific properties. It determines what kind of land uses are allowed, the building envelope/size and how they’re sited, and how such items as landscaped open space should be incorporated.

Applications go through a public process to ensure community feedback is taken into consideration and compatibility with the community is evaluated for each potential development. In most cases, upon the Town’s receipt of a planning application, nearby residents will receive notification, as per the Planning Act.


What does development look like in Lincoln?

The Town of Lincoln embraces smart growth principles to achieve sustainable development. This means:

  • Creating vibrant urban centres;
  • Sustaining a strong economy;
  • Ensuring a healthy environment;
  • Combatting urban sprawl through infill and higher density development;
  • Improving the quality of life for residents – to provide better access to transit, better public realm amenities in the neighbourhood, and supporting growth through new or renewed infrastructure.


The role of the Planning and Development Department

The Planning and Development Department is responsible for reviewing and providing a recommendation to Council regarding development applications. All applications require a process of review and decisions but not all applications require the same steps.

The step-by-step process for consent and minor variances and zoning by-law amendments (at right) are examples where an application requires a public process to come to a Committee and/or Council decision. For example, a pool application may not require a public meeting, and in some cases, the approval authority has been delegated by Council to staff.


How can I get involved and learn about development in my neighbourhood?

  • Learn about upcoming projects that have an impact on our community and share your feedback here
  • Contact the Planning and Development Department
    1. If you receive a notice about a proposed development in your neighbourhood, contact or email the planner for more information.
    2. If you see a development proposal sign in your neighbourhood, make note of the telephone number, file number and address of the property for more information.
  • Attend public meetings
    1. Individuals can register to speak at the Committee of Adjustment meetings and have 10 minutes to present your thoughts and concerns about a development.

Planning affects everyone. It determines where you will live, shop, gather, work or go to school. For example, changes made to the Town’s Official Plan and Zoning Bylaw can impact the height and density of new development. Design guidelines can impact the architecture and design elements you see on buildings and structures.

Because planning impacts what we see and the types of spaces we enjoy in our community, the planning process provides opportunities for public input. Under the Planning Act of Ontario, municipalities are required to notify the public, hold public meetings and request input on important planning decisions.



Do you have any questions about development in Lincoln?

We hope this page offers some more information on how development occurs in Ontario, Niagara Region and Lincoln. If you have any further questions, or questions about specific developments, please send it here and we will do our best to reply within 2-3 business days. 

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    What is the plan for the land behind/near/beside Calvary Gospel on Hixon Road?

    Bridget asked 20 days ago

    A pre-consultation meeting was held early last year to discuss the potential for a low to medium-density housing unit development. To date, no formal planning applications have been submitted.

    Under the existing Official Plan, the open area of the 4129 Hixon Street property is subject to the Low and Medium Density Residential policies, which allows for the construction of single, semi-detached, and townhouse dwellings.  The image below shows the OP policies:

    .

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    Where are the diagrams of the elevation/trail/culvert that were displayed at the Public meeting april 27. The April 2022 concept is there.

    David JENNINGS asked 24 days ago

    Good morning,

    Thank you for connecting with us - the display boards have been updated on the Prudhommes Development Site webpage on SpeakUpLincoln.

    Have a great day!

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    The proposed 3221 North Service Rd development is still under review, but have there been meetings reviewing this or is it at a stand still? How long does the city get to make a decision? When will one be posted?

    CS asked 29 days ago

    Thank you for your inquiry. 

    The Zoning By-law Amendment application at 3221 North Service Road will be considered at the May 24th, 2022, Committee of the Whole Meeting at 6:00 pm electronically.  The applicant has revised their concept plan, which will be made available at the Town’s website: speakuplincoln.ca/development-in-lincoln

    A staff report regarding the application will be available on the website: www.lincoln.ca or from the Planning and Development Department before the meeting date.

    If you wish to appear as an electronic delegation regarding this application, delegation requests are accepted until 12 p.m. on the Friday before the meeting. To appear as a delegation, you must submit a registration request online or contact the Clerk’s department by email at clerks@lincoln.ca or by calling 905-563-2799 Ext 513.

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    Can you tell Me if there is anything planned for the land across from 2825 14 S Grimsby Rd in Lincoln ?

    Marnie Crompton asked 2 months ago

    Thank you for your note.

    The property you are referring to is in the Township of West Lincoln. Please get in touch with the municipality direct at 905-957-3346.

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    As residents of Tintern we have been made aware of the proposed amendment to zoning bylaws to allow for the construction of 5 new homes. The 4 lots on Spring Creek Rd. fall below the current allowable size of a rural residential property. Wasn't one of the main purposes of the current size minimum to allow for sufficient septic needs? Most of us moved here because it was quaint and peaceful. This proposed change brings with it the potential to open this area to further development, which will forever change our hamlet.

    Craig & Cathy Preece asked 4 months ago

    Good Morning, 

    Thank you for your inquiry!

    As you may or may not know, the minimum size of rural lots in Lincoln is governed by the planning policies and regulations within our Official Plan and Zoning By-laws. 

    All new rural residential lots are 4,000 square metres (0.4 hectares/1 acre) in size within the Official Plan. This site is based on the Region’s requirement for private septic services as it allows room on the property for a replacement septic service if the current or proposed one fails. For Tintern, Section 2.2.4. (b)(ii) provides the following policies for new lots:

    • new lots shall be at least a minimum of 10,000 square metres (1.0 hectare) in size unless a hydrogeological study can demonstrate that a smaller lot size will adequately accommodate a private water supply and sustainable private septic system, and
    • In all cases, the minimum lot size shall be 4,000 square metres (0.4 hectares)


    Under the Town’s current zoning by-laws, there are three types of rural lots in Lincoln, those within the Agricultural (A) zone and those within the Hamlet Residential (HR) zone. The A zone requires that all rural residential lots have a minimum size of 4,000 square metres (0.4 hectares). The minimum lot size within the HR designation is 6,000 square metres (0.6 hectares). Still, as noted above, there is flexibility included in the applicable policy if a hydro-g study confirms the viability of a smaller lot. It is also important to note that the only residential built form permitted is single detached dwellings. Of relevance to this application is that many of the existing HR lots in Tintern are below the current minimum property size requirement. For example, several lots along Spring Creek Road and the west side of Tintern Road range from 1,393 square metres to 3,230 square metres.         

    Furthermore, the Town is currently reviewing its Zoning By-law, and the result is expected to more closely align with the Region’s requirements for new private septic services (4,000 square metres). 

     

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    Are there anymore meetings regarding the proposed 3221 North Service Rd development? If it is still under discussion and has not been approved, why is the developer advertising prices considering we don't know how many stories and units are approved?

    cjulian asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for your comments.  The application for Zoning By-law Amendment at 3221 North Service Road currently remains under review by the Town and has not yet received any approvals.   There are no regulations that prohibit the sales and marketing of proposed developments that have not received approvals to date and the Town has no jurisdiction over this.

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    Can speed bumps be installed along Edelheim Road ? Traffic is presently using this road at excessive speeds !

    Clare Minarcik asked 6 months ago

    Thank You for connecting with us, Clare.  

    The Town has previously installed Digital Feedback Signs on Eldeheim Road in 2019 resulting in the 85% percentile of drivers driving at a speed of 35km/h. The Town would not entertain installing speed humps on this road based on these results, however, the Town will include Eldeheim Road on our black cat program for 2022. The black cat radar detects and collects data without drivers knowing that the unit is up, therefore providing accurate speeds.

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    Looking for start up new building

    Lisete Barbosa asked 6 months ago

    Hi, thanks for reaching out to us. We recommend that you reach out directly to the Planning and Development Department to ask specific questions about new building start-ups. Please e-mail planningapplications@lincoln.ca.

    Thank you. 

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    Re: 3221 North Service Road. I watched the Committee of the Whole Zoom meeting November 8th and wanted to comment on this proposed development. My wife and I are residents of Beamsville but we have growing concerns about the number and magnitude of recent mid- and high-rise residential developments that are proposed and recently approved in the Town of Lincoln. The above proposed development really takes the cake. The Prudhomme lands (including this site) have a Secondary Plan approved in 2018, (just over 3 years ago) and the developer paid no heed whatsoever to that, which had maximum building heights of 15 storeys. His now revised plan has been moderated to 20 and 23 storeys and 431 units as well as increasing the parking podium from 3 storeys (which is allowed), to 6 on this very small 1.5+ acre former gas station site. Also, the total density proposed is 124% higher than allowed. I am upset that the planning staff would waste a minute of their time with the initial proposal knowing how ridiculous it was in light of the Secondary Plan’s restrictions on height and density. The planning staff should have simply told the developer that they need to come back with a proposal in line with the Secondary Plan. The residents of Lincoln need our council and their staff to take a much harder stance on these types of over-the-top developments. I thought the Deputy Mayor asked a very telling question to the developer’s planner – paraphrasing it “if they had ever done up a proposal to the Secondary Plan requirements? He said the plan you have in front of you is what we did.” They did not and had no intentions of following the regulations. On the issue of Community Benefits – that is a horrible loophole developers use to get higher density. I have been in the real estate business for over 45 years and have seen this ploy used all the time. They are proposing $300,000 cash and in return they get an additional 136 Units! You could not build a small bungalow for $300,000. I took a quick look at resale condo apartment prices in the Casablanca area of Grimsby. An average price for a 650 sq ft unit with 1 underground parking space was about $500,000 or about $750 per square foot. Using this math the developer gets an extra $68,000,000! There are so many other outpoints with this proposed development. The developer does not want to comply with: • minimum unit sizes • total density requirement • building height • minimum sizes of the parking spaces; or • size of the Parking Aisles so you have cars closer when parked and harder to navigate the aisles. The developer stated that his hard costs to build is about $500 per square foot, which makes it necessary for each tower to have 200 units, otherwise it is not economically feasible. I would propose he simply build stick-built stacked townhouses, which he has done in other communities, at a cost of about half that and he would still make a profit; the town would not have the lake obscured with these ugly Mississauga-style, soulless towers, less parking and traffic issues. The town also retained an architect consultant from Toronto I believe to help with the design. Could they not have retained one from Niagara who would be more sensitive to the fabric of the area? Take a look at the eyesore these folks built in Grimsby. If the town continues to demand adherence to the Secondary Plan here, the residents would hold the province and not the council responsible if the developer went to the Tribunal and won higher heights and density. Building to the Secondary Plan still provides housing numbers but also sends a message that we take our zoning and Official Plan seriously so future developers will know we are not going to be pushed around. If we do not, what do you think the next developer will do when it is their turn to build? I was heartened by the overall responses that I heard in the Zoom meeting November 8 from our councilors and Mayor Easton and I hope it carries through when council meets to consider it and stick to their guns and only allow what is permitted by the Secondary Plan. Please do not engage with the Community Benefits shell game. Thanks for considering. Best Regards, David B. Jacobs

    DBJ asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your comments.  The applicant, on behalf of the owner of 3221 North Service, submitted a complete Zoning By-law Amendment application to the Town for the proposed high-rise residential development.  This planning process is legislated by the Province of Ontario under the Planning Act and allows any property owner to submit planning applications that do not meet the Town’s Official Plan policies and/or Zoning By-law. Under the Planning Act, The Town is required to process these planning applications and make decisions in a timely manner.  Council have not made any decisions with respect to the current application and it remains under review by the Town staff.  Building height, density and community benefits are important components of the subject planning application and the comments you have provided will be considered as part of the Town’s review of this proposal.

     Please note - If you would like to make a formal written submission, it will be included as part of the public record and presented at the Committee of the Whole as part of the staff recommendation report.. To do so, please contact the Clerk of the Town of Lincoln at clerks@lincoln.ca

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    Do you post minutes of the Planning Dept meetings?

    Sylvia hokansson asked 6 months ago

    Thanks for your question. Planning and Economic Development meetings are part of the Committee of the Whole meetings. 

    Links to the minutes of these meetings can be found in the Council and Committee Calendar on the Town’s website: https://lincoln.ca/council-agendas-minutes

Page last updated: 09 May 2022, 01:46 PM