Jordan Hollow Indigenous Cultural Park

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About Jordan Hollow Park

Jordan Hollow Park is located at 3039 King St, Jordan, in Ward 3. The park currently features a gravel parking lot and 1.19 acres of greenspace. It is used as a passive space and as a trail access point to the Twenty Valley Trail and Bruce Trail. This site has an important and rich cultural history related to Indigenous inhabitation of the land, and in particular to an Iroquoian-speaking confederation of tribes known as the Neutral Nation who lived in the vicinity around 1600.

In partnership with a group of Indigenous and environmental stakeholders as well as design consultants, the Town is leading the development of a park enhancement plan for the site which is currently in the detailed design stage.


Current Lawn at Jordan Hollow Park
Existing Conditions

Current Lawn at Jordan Hollow ParkExisting Conditions


Jordan Hollow Park will undergo redevelopment with the goals of:

  • Creating a welcoming and inclusive space;
  • Acknowledging and celebrating Indigenous connections to the land, in particular that of the Neutral Nation;
  • Supporting ecological health; and
  • Becoming a distinct feature within the Town of Lincoln’s ‘Cultural Corridor'.

The Town is committed to Reconciliation and renewed relationships with Indigenous peoples based on the recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership. Developing this this park so that it recognizes the history and culture of Indigenous peoples, as well as their connection to the land, is part of the Town of Lincoln's strategy to increase inclusion and access for all residents and contribute to the process of Reconciliation.


Project Team

The project team includes representatives from Town of Lincoln, Niagara Regional Native Centre, Carolinian Coalition, Green Venture, Ontariogreen Conservation Association, and Elders and Indigenous artists/community members. The project team provides leadership and direction for the park and advises on consultation, engagement, and administrative processes.

The Town of Lincoln issued a Request for Proposals to Indigenous Artists and/or collaborative design teams to create a Park Concept Design. The concept design was selected by a jury of arts and history professionals in January 2022.

The Town received three proposals through the RFP process. After an extensive evaluation that considered the concept design, artists’ experience, portfolio of work, and the ability to meet project requirements with creativity, Adesso Design Inc. and Two Row Architect were the selected team.

Established in 2008, Adesso Design Inc. (Adesso) is a full-service landscape architectural firm based in Hamilton with projects ranging from small scale residential to large scale master planned communities. They believe that the success of any project relies on teamwork and good communication. Adesso has aligned itself with a strong network of consultants with similar principles and a commitment to innovative design.

Since its inception in 1992, Two Row Architect (TRA) has focused on providing services to projects for Indigenous clients as well as those that incorporate Indigenous cultural ideologies and teachings manifested in architectural form. Over the last 27 years, TRA has worked with the majority of Indigenous Groups throughout Ontario on multiple projects and has also worked with multiple universities and colleges throughout the province. TRA takes great pride in their Indigenous heritage as four of their employees are of Indigenous descent. TRA will assist in promoting an architectural approach that realizes the meshing of local traditional knowledge (Indigenous arts/crafts/design) with current building technology. They also promote the creative and environmentally conscious use of building materials, and maximum Indigenous involvement to benefit local communities. TRA’s office is located on the Six Nations of the Grand River territory.


Approved Park Concept

The final design concept was presented to Town of Lincoln Council at the April 25th Committee of the Whole meeting. See Report CS-07-22 and corresponding presentation.

The park's design incorporates the following elements:

  • A rain garden including native plant species, educational signage and monitoring well;
  • Rest and comfort areas including permanent shade and table seating;
  • Berms for a dynamic landscape and natural amphitheater for performances and gatherings;
  • Elements to support active transportation including new pathways, an enhanced Bruce Trail connection, future trail connection opportunities, bicycle parking and repair station;
  • Trees, plantings and new park signage
  • Garbage and recycling receptacles;
  • Architectural features inspired by cultural forms including a palisade and longhouse; and
  • Interpretive storytelling signage and evolving art installations opportunities including rock podiums.

Park Concept Design
View from park entrance towards park. Covered structure will provide bike parking and bike repair station.
Contemporary interpretation of longhouse structure will provide shade and a programming and interpretive space.
Berm to provide natural slope towards longhouse structure, creating amphitheater effect.
View from pathway towards longhouse structure. Park will include rock podiums (pictured) as locations for future public art elements, both temporary and permanent.
View from parking lot towards longhouse structure and trailhead
Palisades (with accompanying interpretive signage) will provide historically appropriate cultural forms and a natural privacy screen for adjacent property owners.



History of the Site

Pre-Contact Settlement

Lincoln has a cultural history that began over 12,000 years ago, and continues to the present. The village of Jordan is a particularly significant site of Indigenous settlement in Southern Ontario, with recent archaeological evidence confirming settlement adjacent to the Twenty Mile Creek by the Attawandaron or ‘Neutrals’, an Iroquoian speaking group of settled village horticulturalists, dating to the early sixteenth century.

Post-Contact Settlement

Jordan Hollow Park is within Treaty 3, the Between the Lakes Purchase. In 1784, the English colonial government entered into an agreement with Mississaugas to acquire over one million acres of land in-part spanning westward from near modern day Niagara-on-the-Lake along the south shore of Lake Ontario to modern day Burlington (Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, 2016). The “Between the Lakes Purchase” was signed by Sir Frederick Haldimand (representing the Crown) and the Mississaugas.

Louth Township

Louth Township was first settled in 1777, after soldiers of Butler’s Rangers were given loyalist land grants by the Crown. In the 1790s, a group of Mennonite families from Pennsylvania bought 1100 acres of land and settled in the township leaving a distinct economic and cultural impression on the area.

Louth has a number of waterways that greatly helped the early industrial development of the township, including the Twenty, Sixteen and Fifteen Mile creeks. The communities of Jordan and Jordan Station developed into busy shipping centres on the Twenty, exporting logs, tan bark, hides, ashes, and later agricultural produce. With the construction of the Great Western Railway bridge across the Twenty in 1852, Jordan Station lost its importance as a harbour, but it continued to grow, and eventually the shipping of fruit became a major industry in the township. Today Louth is mainly agricultural (Mika & Mika 1981).

Jordan Dwarf Village Inn

While little is known about the Dwarf Village, newspaper clippings state that it was operational as of 1925-1926 and was owned by two Greek brothers whose last name was Bolis. The village was located within the current subject property on Lot 19, Concession 5, Louth Township. The inn consisted of food stands which served alcohol prior to prohibition (Image 1), and multiple buildings which served as the inn’s guest cabins (Image 2) (Lincoln Public Library 2021).



Project Funding

Funding for the Park was approved by Town of Lincoln Council in December 2019. Throughout 2020 and 2021 Town of Lincoln Staff and project partners have submitted funding applications to regional, provincial, and national agencies to increase the project budget.

The Town of Lincoln has secured funding for this project from a number of sources including the Government of Canada, Niagara Region, Greenbelt Foundation, and Niagara Community Foundation. External funding represents 80% of the total project budget.


Twenty Mile Creek Arch Bridge Replacement - Niagara Region

The Twenty Mile Creek Arch Bridge Replacement Project is scheduled to begin in Q1 2023 with anticipated completion in Q3 2024. Use of Jordan Hollow park is required as a laydown area to mitigate impact to vehicular traffic on King Street (Hwy. 8).

The bridge is located on King Street / Highway 81 in the Jordan Hollow area of the Town of Lincoln and presently functions as a two-lane arterial road serving east/west traffic flows. This stretch of Regional Road 81 is identified in the Niagara Region Transportation Master Plan as an infill link as part of the Strategic Cycling Network. Currently, there are sidewalks located on both sides of the bridge and a pedestrian path under the east arch. The 2017 biennial bridge inspection identified that the sidewalks and curbs are generally in poor condition.

The Niagara Region will replace the bridge and widen it on both sides of existing roadway. The pathway under the existing bridge will be maintained, and will provide safe pedestrian access between the north and south side of Regional Road 81. Regional staff presented a project updated to Town of Lincoln Council at the April 25th Committee of the Whole meeting. See corresponding presentation.


Twenty Valley Trail Revitalization Project - Ontario Heritage Trust

The Ontario Heritage Trust is partnering with the Town of Lincoln, the Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority and the Bruce Trail Conservancy on the Niagara Twenty Valley Trail Revitalization Project. This expanded trail network will enhance visitors’ access to natural and cultural heritage sites in the Niagara region – such as the Lincoln Museum and Cultural Centre, Ball’s Falls Conservation Area, the Trust’s Ellis property and more--and will contribute to local tourism and recreational opportunities for the area. Thanks to a $50,000 grant from the Greenbelt Foundation to the Ontario Heritage Trust, work at the Trust’s Ellis property in Jordan Village began in March 2022.

This work involves a feasibility study to plan out the trail pathways, identify areas of improvement and necessary infrastructure, and the creation and installation of trail signage. The final trail construction will be completed as a later phase of work. The Trust’s Ellis property will be closed while the feasibility study is underway. Usage of the trails along the current Twenty Valley Trail will remain open.

The current Twenty Valley Trail is a scenic two-km (1.2-mile) trail that starts in Ball’s Falls Conservation Area and ends at Lake Ontario, connecting with the Waterfront Trail. Once the trail revitalization project is complete, visitors hiking along the Niagara Twenty Valley Trail will be able to access a continuous 1,366-km trail network (849 miles) connecting Ball’s Falls to the Ontario Heritage Trust’s Ellis property (a natural heritage site recognized as an Environmentally Significant Area), the Bruce Trail and side trails, the main street of Jordan Village and the Lincoln Museum and Cultural Centre.

See full media release from Ontario Heritage Trust.

About Jordan Hollow Park

Jordan Hollow Park is located at 3039 King St, Jordan, in Ward 3. The park currently features a gravel parking lot and 1.19 acres of greenspace. It is used as a passive space and as a trail access point to the Twenty Valley Trail and Bruce Trail. This site has an important and rich cultural history related to Indigenous inhabitation of the land, and in particular to an Iroquoian-speaking confederation of tribes known as the Neutral Nation who lived in the vicinity around 1600.

In partnership with a group of Indigenous and environmental stakeholders as well as design consultants, the Town is leading the development of a park enhancement plan for the site which is currently in the detailed design stage.


Current Lawn at Jordan Hollow Park
Existing Conditions

Current Lawn at Jordan Hollow ParkExisting Conditions


Jordan Hollow Park will undergo redevelopment with the goals of:

  • Creating a welcoming and inclusive space;
  • Acknowledging and celebrating Indigenous connections to the land, in particular that of the Neutral Nation;
  • Supporting ecological health; and
  • Becoming a distinct feature within the Town of Lincoln’s ‘Cultural Corridor'.

The Town is committed to Reconciliation and renewed relationships with Indigenous peoples based on the recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership. Developing this this park so that it recognizes the history and culture of Indigenous peoples, as well as their connection to the land, is part of the Town of Lincoln's strategy to increase inclusion and access for all residents and contribute to the process of Reconciliation.


Project Team

The project team includes representatives from Town of Lincoln, Niagara Regional Native Centre, Carolinian Coalition, Green Venture, Ontariogreen Conservation Association, and Elders and Indigenous artists/community members. The project team provides leadership and direction for the park and advises on consultation, engagement, and administrative processes.

The Town of Lincoln issued a Request for Proposals to Indigenous Artists and/or collaborative design teams to create a Park Concept Design. The concept design was selected by a jury of arts and history professionals in January 2022.

The Town received three proposals through the RFP process. After an extensive evaluation that considered the concept design, artists’ experience, portfolio of work, and the ability to meet project requirements with creativity, Adesso Design Inc. and Two Row Architect were the selected team.

Established in 2008, Adesso Design Inc. (Adesso) is a full-service landscape architectural firm based in Hamilton with projects ranging from small scale residential to large scale master planned communities. They believe that the success of any project relies on teamwork and good communication. Adesso has aligned itself with a strong network of consultants with similar principles and a commitment to innovative design.

Since its inception in 1992, Two Row Architect (TRA) has focused on providing services to projects for Indigenous clients as well as those that incorporate Indigenous cultural ideologies and teachings manifested in architectural form. Over the last 27 years, TRA has worked with the majority of Indigenous Groups throughout Ontario on multiple projects and has also worked with multiple universities and colleges throughout the province. TRA takes great pride in their Indigenous heritage as four of their employees are of Indigenous descent. TRA will assist in promoting an architectural approach that realizes the meshing of local traditional knowledge (Indigenous arts/crafts/design) with current building technology. They also promote the creative and environmentally conscious use of building materials, and maximum Indigenous involvement to benefit local communities. TRA’s office is located on the Six Nations of the Grand River territory.


Approved Park Concept

The final design concept was presented to Town of Lincoln Council at the April 25th Committee of the Whole meeting. See Report CS-07-22 and corresponding presentation.

The park's design incorporates the following elements:

  • A rain garden including native plant species, educational signage and monitoring well;
  • Rest and comfort areas including permanent shade and table seating;
  • Berms for a dynamic landscape and natural amphitheater for performances and gatherings;
  • Elements to support active transportation including new pathways, an enhanced Bruce Trail connection, future trail connection opportunities, bicycle parking and repair station;
  • Trees, plantings and new park signage
  • Garbage and recycling receptacles;
  • Architectural features inspired by cultural forms including a palisade and longhouse; and
  • Interpretive storytelling signage and evolving art installations opportunities including rock podiums.

Park Concept Design
View from park entrance towards park. Covered structure will provide bike parking and bike repair station.
Contemporary interpretation of longhouse structure will provide shade and a programming and interpretive space.
Berm to provide natural slope towards longhouse structure, creating amphitheater effect.
View from pathway towards longhouse structure. Park will include rock podiums (pictured) as locations for future public art elements, both temporary and permanent.
View from parking lot towards longhouse structure and trailhead
Palisades (with accompanying interpretive signage) will provide historically appropriate cultural forms and a natural privacy screen for adjacent property owners.



History of the Site

Pre-Contact Settlement

Lincoln has a cultural history that began over 12,000 years ago, and continues to the present. The village of Jordan is a particularly significant site of Indigenous settlement in Southern Ontario, with recent archaeological evidence confirming settlement adjacent to the Twenty Mile Creek by the Attawandaron or ‘Neutrals’, an Iroquoian speaking group of settled village horticulturalists, dating to the early sixteenth century.

Post-Contact Settlement

Jordan Hollow Park is within Treaty 3, the Between the Lakes Purchase. In 1784, the English colonial government entered into an agreement with Mississaugas to acquire over one million acres of land in-part spanning westward from near modern day Niagara-on-the-Lake along the south shore of Lake Ontario to modern day Burlington (Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, 2016). The “Between the Lakes Purchase” was signed by Sir Frederick Haldimand (representing the Crown) and the Mississaugas.

Louth Township

Louth Township was first settled in 1777, after soldiers of Butler’s Rangers were given loyalist land grants by the Crown. In the 1790s, a group of Mennonite families from Pennsylvania bought 1100 acres of land and settled in the township leaving a distinct economic and cultural impression on the area.

Louth has a number of waterways that greatly helped the early industrial development of the township, including the Twenty, Sixteen and Fifteen Mile creeks. The communities of Jordan and Jordan Station developed into busy shipping centres on the Twenty, exporting logs, tan bark, hides, ashes, and later agricultural produce. With the construction of the Great Western Railway bridge across the Twenty in 1852, Jordan Station lost its importance as a harbour, but it continued to grow, and eventually the shipping of fruit became a major industry in the township. Today Louth is mainly agricultural (Mika & Mika 1981).

Jordan Dwarf Village Inn

While little is known about the Dwarf Village, newspaper clippings state that it was operational as of 1925-1926 and was owned by two Greek brothers whose last name was Bolis. The village was located within the current subject property on Lot 19, Concession 5, Louth Township. The inn consisted of food stands which served alcohol prior to prohibition (Image 1), and multiple buildings which served as the inn’s guest cabins (Image 2) (Lincoln Public Library 2021).



Project Funding

Funding for the Park was approved by Town of Lincoln Council in December 2019. Throughout 2020 and 2021 Town of Lincoln Staff and project partners have submitted funding applications to regional, provincial, and national agencies to increase the project budget.

The Town of Lincoln has secured funding for this project from a number of sources including the Government of Canada, Niagara Region, Greenbelt Foundation, and Niagara Community Foundation. External funding represents 80% of the total project budget.


Twenty Mile Creek Arch Bridge Replacement - Niagara Region

The Twenty Mile Creek Arch Bridge Replacement Project is scheduled to begin in Q1 2023 with anticipated completion in Q3 2024. Use of Jordan Hollow park is required as a laydown area to mitigate impact to vehicular traffic on King Street (Hwy. 8).

The bridge is located on King Street / Highway 81 in the Jordan Hollow area of the Town of Lincoln and presently functions as a two-lane arterial road serving east/west traffic flows. This stretch of Regional Road 81 is identified in the Niagara Region Transportation Master Plan as an infill link as part of the Strategic Cycling Network. Currently, there are sidewalks located on both sides of the bridge and a pedestrian path under the east arch. The 2017 biennial bridge inspection identified that the sidewalks and curbs are generally in poor condition.

The Niagara Region will replace the bridge and widen it on both sides of existing roadway. The pathway under the existing bridge will be maintained, and will provide safe pedestrian access between the north and south side of Regional Road 81. Regional staff presented a project updated to Town of Lincoln Council at the April 25th Committee of the Whole meeting. See corresponding presentation.


Twenty Valley Trail Revitalization Project - Ontario Heritage Trust

The Ontario Heritage Trust is partnering with the Town of Lincoln, the Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority and the Bruce Trail Conservancy on the Niagara Twenty Valley Trail Revitalization Project. This expanded trail network will enhance visitors’ access to natural and cultural heritage sites in the Niagara region – such as the Lincoln Museum and Cultural Centre, Ball’s Falls Conservation Area, the Trust’s Ellis property and more--and will contribute to local tourism and recreational opportunities for the area. Thanks to a $50,000 grant from the Greenbelt Foundation to the Ontario Heritage Trust, work at the Trust’s Ellis property in Jordan Village began in March 2022.

This work involves a feasibility study to plan out the trail pathways, identify areas of improvement and necessary infrastructure, and the creation and installation of trail signage. The final trail construction will be completed as a later phase of work. The Trust’s Ellis property will be closed while the feasibility study is underway. Usage of the trails along the current Twenty Valley Trail will remain open.

The current Twenty Valley Trail is a scenic two-km (1.2-mile) trail that starts in Ball’s Falls Conservation Area and ends at Lake Ontario, connecting with the Waterfront Trail. Once the trail revitalization project is complete, visitors hiking along the Niagara Twenty Valley Trail will be able to access a continuous 1,366-km trail network (849 miles) connecting Ball’s Falls to the Ontario Heritage Trust’s Ellis property (a natural heritage site recognized as an Environmentally Significant Area), the Bruce Trail and side trails, the main street of Jordan Village and the Lincoln Museum and Cultural Centre.

See full media release from Ontario Heritage Trust.

Do you have any questions about the Jordan Hollow Park Enhancements?

We welcome your questions and feedback, and will endeavour to reply to you in a timely manner. 

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    We are not clear about the pathway or extended road shoulder will allow connection between Brookside and nineteenth street communities we have no way to walk to the hollow it is dangerous either way and there’s literally nowhere safe to walk the 40 dogs in the Brookside area.

    Joanne asked about 2 months ago

    The Niagara Region is conducting an Environmental Assessment (EA) Study over 2022 and 2023 to evaluate alternatives for active transportation connections along the King Street (Regional Road 81) corridor between Vineland and Jordan. At this time there is not an established timeline of when the infrastructure will be constructed.

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    Will you be adding some native plants?

    GinaG asked over 1 year ago

    Similar to our response to other questions listed here, the existing trees will be preserved and worked into the final design and a rain garden will be installed adjacent to the parking lot to capture and infiltrate runoff. The rain garden design and plant list has been created with the guidance of Carolinian Canada Coalition. This pilot project will include educational signage that provides information on the plants used as well as the installed monitoring system. All plants, including the trees that were planted in October 2020, will be native to feed local pollinators.

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    Would love to see a very natural planting area with native plants and a floral corridor for bees and pollinators and for wildlife.

    Annette asked over 1 year ago

    Similar to our response to other questions listed here, the existing trees will be preserved and worked into the final design and a rain garden will be installed adjacent to the parking lot to capture and infiltrate runoff. The rain garden design and plant list has been created with the guidance of Carolinian Canada Coalition. This pilot project will include educational signage that provides information on the plants used as well as the installed monitoring system. All plants, including the trees that were planted in October 2020, will be native to feed local pollinators.

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    this might be the time to ask if you could figure out a place to put the garbage and recycling containers somewhere other than attached to the main feature of the covered wagon. It makes it very difficult to take pretty photographs with those container there! Been meaning to ask you since they were put in that location. // Just throwing this idea over to ask that everything planted in there be native and not invasive species. That the old pear trees be left standing, please don't cut them down. They can last for many decades to come and are interesting features in the park and feed wildlife :) ) A wonderful place for pollinator gardens, native gardens and educational signage letting people know the species and why they are being planted.

    Carla Carlson asked over 1 year ago

    The garbage and recycling containers will be moved to a better suited location that works with the layout of the final design, however the exact location will be determined in the design process. The existing trees will be preserved and worked into the final design and a rain garden will be installed adjacent to the parking lot to capture and infiltrate runoff. The rain garden design and plant list has been created with the guidance of Carolinian Canada Coalition. This pilot project will include educational signage that provides information on the plants used as well as the installed monitoring system. All plants, including the trees that were planted in October 2020, will be native to feed local pollinators. 

Page last updated: 21 Nov 2022, 07:43 AM