Jordan Hollow Park Enhancements

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What's Happening

Jordan Hollow Park is located at 3039 King St, Jordan, in Ward 3. The park features a gravel parking lot and 1.19 acres of greenspace. It is currently used as a passive space and as a trail access point to the Twenty Valley Trail. This site has an important and rich cultural history related to Indigenous inhabitation of the land, and in particular to an Iroquoian-speaking confederation of tribes known as the Neutral Nation who lived in the vicinity around 1600.

In partnership with a group of Indigenous and environmental stakeholders, the Town is leading the development of a park enhancement plan for the site which is currently in the preliminary concept design stage. The final park plan will include new trees and plantings, lawn areas, paved pathways, site furnishings, art, interpretive elements, and other enhancements.

Current photos of Jordan Hollow Park


Project Goals

Jordan Hollow Park will undergo redevelopment with the goals of:

  • Creating a welcoming and inclusive space;
  • Acknowledging and celebrating Indigenous connections to the land, in particular that of the Neutral Nation;
  • Supporting ecological health; and
  • Becoming a distinct feature within the Town of Lincoln’s ‘Cultural Corridor'.

The Town is committed to reconciliation and renewed relationships with Indigenous peoples based on the recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership. Developing this this park so that it recognizes the history and culture of Indigenous peoples, as well as their connection to the land, is part of the Town of Lincoln's strategy to increase inclusion and access for all residents and contribute to the process of Reconciliation.

About the Project

Funding for the Park was approved by Town of Lincoln Council in December 2019, and a Park Committee was implemented. The Committee provides leadership and direction for the park and advises on consultation, engagement, and administrative processes. The Committee includes representatives from Landscape of Nations 360, Town of Lincoln, Niagara Regional Native Centre, Carolinian Coalition, Green Venture, Ontariogreen Conservation Association, and Elders and Indigenous artists/community members.

Throughout 2020 and 2021 Town of Lincoln Staff and project partners have submitted funding applications to regional, provincial, and national agencies to increase the project budget.

Call for Artists

The Town of Lincoln will issue a Request for Proposals to Indigenous Artists and/or collaborative design teams to create a Park Concept Design. The Concept Design may include footpaths, plantings, landscape elements (performance area, shade structure, seating), and artwork. Up to six artists or design teams will be shortlisted by a Jury of arts, curatorial, and design professionals.

The selected final design will be revealed to the public in February 2022.

For more information on the call to artists please see: https://akimbo.ca/listings/request-for-proposals-jordan-hollow-indigenous-cultural-park-concept-design-lincoln-on/

History of the Site

Pre-Contact Settlement

Lincoln has a cultural history that began over 12,000 years ago, and continues to the present. The village of Jordan is a particularly significant site of Indigenous settlement in Southern Ontario, with recent archaeological evidence confirming settlement adjacent to the Twenty Mile Creek by the Attawandaron or ‘Neutrals’, an Iroquoian speaking group of settled village horticulturalists, dating to the early sixteenth century.

Post-Contact Settlement

Jordan Hollow Park is within Treaty 3, the Between the Lakes Purchase. In 1784, the English colonial government entered into an agreement with Mississaugas to acquire over one million acres of land in-part spanning westward from near modern day Niagara-on-the-Lake along the south shore of Lake Ontario to modern day Burlington (Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, 2016). The “Between the Lakes Purchase” was signed by Sir Frederick Haldimand (representing the Crown) and the Mississaugas.

Louth Township

Louth Township was first settled in 1777, after soldiers of Butler’s Rangers were given loyalist land grants by the Crown. In the 1790s, a group of Mennonite families from Pennsylvania bought 1100 acres of land and settled in the township leaving a distinct economic and cultural impression on the area.

Louth has a number of waterways that greatly helped the early industrial development of the township, including the Twenty, Sixteen and Fifteen Mile creeks. The communities of Jordan and Jordan Station developed into busy shipping centres on the Twenty, exporting logs, tan bark, hides, ashes, and later agricultural produce. With the construction of the Great Western Railway bridge across the Twenty in 1852, Jordan Station lost its importance as a harbour, but it continued to grow, and eventually the shipping of fruit became a major industry in the township. Today Louth is mainly agricultural (Mika & Mika 1981).

Jordan Dwarf Village Inn

While little is known about the Dwarf Village, newspaper clippings state that it was operational as of 1925-1926 and was owned by two Greek brothers whose last name was Bolis. The village was located within the current subject property on Lot 19, Concession 5, Louth Township. The inn consisted of food stands which served alcohol prior to prohibition (Image 1), and multiple buildings which served as the inn’s guest cabins (Image 2) (Lincoln Public Library 2021).




What's Happening

Jordan Hollow Park is located at 3039 King St, Jordan, in Ward 3. The park features a gravel parking lot and 1.19 acres of greenspace. It is currently used as a passive space and as a trail access point to the Twenty Valley Trail. This site has an important and rich cultural history related to Indigenous inhabitation of the land, and in particular to an Iroquoian-speaking confederation of tribes known as the Neutral Nation who lived in the vicinity around 1600.

In partnership with a group of Indigenous and environmental stakeholders, the Town is leading the development of a park enhancement plan for the site which is currently in the preliminary concept design stage. The final park plan will include new trees and plantings, lawn areas, paved pathways, site furnishings, art, interpretive elements, and other enhancements.

Current photos of Jordan Hollow Park


Project Goals

Jordan Hollow Park will undergo redevelopment with the goals of:

  • Creating a welcoming and inclusive space;
  • Acknowledging and celebrating Indigenous connections to the land, in particular that of the Neutral Nation;
  • Supporting ecological health; and
  • Becoming a distinct feature within the Town of Lincoln’s ‘Cultural Corridor'.

The Town is committed to reconciliation and renewed relationships with Indigenous peoples based on the recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership. Developing this this park so that it recognizes the history and culture of Indigenous peoples, as well as their connection to the land, is part of the Town of Lincoln's strategy to increase inclusion and access for all residents and contribute to the process of Reconciliation.

About the Project

Funding for the Park was approved by Town of Lincoln Council in December 2019, and a Park Committee was implemented. The Committee provides leadership and direction for the park and advises on consultation, engagement, and administrative processes. The Committee includes representatives from Landscape of Nations 360, Town of Lincoln, Niagara Regional Native Centre, Carolinian Coalition, Green Venture, Ontariogreen Conservation Association, and Elders and Indigenous artists/community members.

Throughout 2020 and 2021 Town of Lincoln Staff and project partners have submitted funding applications to regional, provincial, and national agencies to increase the project budget.

Call for Artists

The Town of Lincoln will issue a Request for Proposals to Indigenous Artists and/or collaborative design teams to create a Park Concept Design. The Concept Design may include footpaths, plantings, landscape elements (performance area, shade structure, seating), and artwork. Up to six artists or design teams will be shortlisted by a Jury of arts, curatorial, and design professionals.

The selected final design will be revealed to the public in February 2022.

For more information on the call to artists please see: https://akimbo.ca/listings/request-for-proposals-jordan-hollow-indigenous-cultural-park-concept-design-lincoln-on/

History of the Site

Pre-Contact Settlement

Lincoln has a cultural history that began over 12,000 years ago, and continues to the present. The village of Jordan is a particularly significant site of Indigenous settlement in Southern Ontario, with recent archaeological evidence confirming settlement adjacent to the Twenty Mile Creek by the Attawandaron or ‘Neutrals’, an Iroquoian speaking group of settled village horticulturalists, dating to the early sixteenth century.

Post-Contact Settlement

Jordan Hollow Park is within Treaty 3, the Between the Lakes Purchase. In 1784, the English colonial government entered into an agreement with Mississaugas to acquire over one million acres of land in-part spanning westward from near modern day Niagara-on-the-Lake along the south shore of Lake Ontario to modern day Burlington (Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, 2016). The “Between the Lakes Purchase” was signed by Sir Frederick Haldimand (representing the Crown) and the Mississaugas.

Louth Township

Louth Township was first settled in 1777, after soldiers of Butler’s Rangers were given loyalist land grants by the Crown. In the 1790s, a group of Mennonite families from Pennsylvania bought 1100 acres of land and settled in the township leaving a distinct economic and cultural impression on the area.

Louth has a number of waterways that greatly helped the early industrial development of the township, including the Twenty, Sixteen and Fifteen Mile creeks. The communities of Jordan and Jordan Station developed into busy shipping centres on the Twenty, exporting logs, tan bark, hides, ashes, and later agricultural produce. With the construction of the Great Western Railway bridge across the Twenty in 1852, Jordan Station lost its importance as a harbour, but it continued to grow, and eventually the shipping of fruit became a major industry in the township. Today Louth is mainly agricultural (Mika & Mika 1981).

Jordan Dwarf Village Inn

While little is known about the Dwarf Village, newspaper clippings state that it was operational as of 1925-1926 and was owned by two Greek brothers whose last name was Bolis. The village was located within the current subject property on Lot 19, Concession 5, Louth Township. The inn consisted of food stands which served alcohol prior to prohibition (Image 1), and multiple buildings which served as the inn’s guest cabins (Image 2) (Lincoln Public Library 2021).




Do you have any questions about the Jordan Hollow Park Enhancements?

We welcome your questions and feedback, and will endeavour to reply to you in a timely manner. 

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    Will you be adding some native plants?

    GinaG asked 4 months ago

    Similar to our response to other questions listed here, the existing trees will be preserved and worked into the final design and a rain garden will be installed adjacent to the parking lot to capture and infiltrate runoff. The rain garden design and plant list has been created with the guidance of Carolinian Canada Coalition. This pilot project will include educational signage that provides information on the plants used as well as the installed monitoring system. All plants, including the trees that were planted in October 2020, will be native to feed local pollinators.

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    Would love to see a very natural planting area with native plants and a floral corridor for bees and pollinators and for wildlife.

    Annette asked 4 months ago

    Similar to our response to other questions listed here, the existing trees will be preserved and worked into the final design and a rain garden will be installed adjacent to the parking lot to capture and infiltrate runoff. The rain garden design and plant list has been created with the guidance of Carolinian Canada Coalition. This pilot project will include educational signage that provides information on the plants used as well as the installed monitoring system. All plants, including the trees that were planted in October 2020, will be native to feed local pollinators.

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    this might be the time to ask if you could figure out a place to put the garbage and recycling containers somewhere other than attached to the main feature of the covered wagon. It makes it very difficult to take pretty photographs with those container there! Been meaning to ask you since they were put in that location. // Just throwing this idea over to ask that everything planted in there be native and not invasive species. That the old pear trees be left standing, please don't cut them down. They can last for many decades to come and are interesting features in the park and feed wildlife :) ) A wonderful place for pollinator gardens, native gardens and educational signage letting people know the species and why they are being planted.

    Carla Carlson asked 4 months ago

    The garbage and recycling containers will be moved to a better suited location that works with the layout of the final design, however the exact location will be determined in the design process. The existing trees will be preserved and worked into the final design and a rain garden will be installed adjacent to the parking lot to capture and infiltrate runoff. The rain garden design and plant list has been created with the guidance of Carolinian Canada Coalition. This pilot project will include educational signage that provides information on the plants used as well as the installed monitoring system. All plants, including the trees that were planted in October 2020, will be native to feed local pollinators. 

Page last updated: 15 November 2021, 12:06